Utility Menu

Humble Approach Initiative

All Souls College, Oxford University

19, 20, and 21 October 2007
Participants
Alister E. McGrath, chair
Alain Besançon
Grace Davie
Timothy Garton Ash
Roger Kimball
Leszek Kolakowski
Steven M. Lukes
Krzysztof Michalski
Alan C. Montefiore
Krzysztof Pomian
Gesine Schwan
Janet Martin Soskice

Princeton University

4, 5, and 6 October 2007
Participants
Simon Asher Levin, Chair
Kwame Anthony Appiah
Robert Axelrod
Steven J. Brams
John E. Hare
Dominic D. P. Johnson
Ehud Kalai
Eric S. Maskin
Martin A. Nowak
Barry O’Neill
Elinor Ostrom
Thomas C. Schelling
Karl Sigmund
Brian Skyrms
Robert Sugden
Games, Groups, and the Global Good

Games, Groups, and the Global Good

Edited by Simon A. Levin
Springer, 2009

The first in a three-part series, this volume explores how game theory's strategic formulation of central problems in the analysis of social interactions is used to develop multi-level theories that examine the interplay between individuals and the collectives they form. The authors suggest that conventional analyses need to be broadened to explain how heuristics, like concepts of fairness, arise and become formalized into the ethical principles embraced by a society. The Games, Groups, God(s) and the Global Good symposium was chaired by Simon A. Levin, George M.

Workshop:

4, 5, and 6 October 2007

Princeton University

Castel Gandolfo, Italy

21, 22, and 23 June 2007
Participants
John Charlton Polkinghorne, chair
Michael Detlefsen
Mary Leng
Peter Lipton
Roger Penrose
Gideon A. Rosen
Stewart D. Shapiro
Mark Steiner
Meaning in Mathematics

Meaning in Mathematics

Edited by John Polkinghorne
Oxford University Press, July 2011

 

 

Is mathematics a highly sophisticated intellectual game in which the adepts display their skill by tackling invented problems, or are mathematicians engaged in acts of discovery as they explore an independent realm of mathematical reality? Why does this seemingly abstract discipline provide the key to unlocking the deep secrets of the physical universe? How one answers these questions will significantly influence metaphysical thinking about reality.

Workshop:

21, 22, and 23 June 2007

Castel Gandolfo, Italy

Yosemite National Park, California

19, 20, and 21 April 2007
Participants
Christof Koch, chair
George F. R. Ellis
Itzhak Fried
Christopher D. Frith
Güven Güzeldere
Mark Hallett
J. A. Scott Kelso
Hans Küng
Nancey Claire Murphy
William Thomas Newsome, III
Timothy O’Connor
Sean A. Spence
Evan Thompson
Daniel M. Wegner
Downward Causation and the Neurobiology of Free Will (Understanding Complex Systems)

Downward Causation and the Neurobiology of Free Will (Understanding Complex Systems)

Edited by Nancey Murphy, George F.R. Ellis, and Timothy O'Connor
Springer, 2009
 

How is free will possible in light of the physical and chemical underpinnings of brain activity and recent neurobiological experiments? How can the emergence of complexity in hierarchical systems such as the brain, based at the lower levels in physical interactions, lead to something like genuine free will? A key tool in understanding how free will may arise in this context is the idea of downward causation in complex systems, happening coterminously with bottom up causation, to form an integral whole.

Workshop:

19, 20, and 21 April 2007

Yosemite National Park, California

La Ferme, Trosley-Breuil, France

17, 18, and 19 March 2007
Participants
Xavier Le Pichon, co-chair
Johannes S. (Hans) Reinders, co-chair
Roy F. Baumeister
Brian R. Brock
Pamela P. Cushing
William C. Gaventa
Stanley M. Hauerwas
Christopher J. Newell
Stephen G. Post
Christina M. Puchalski
Kevin Scott Reimer
John Swinton
Jean Vanier
The Paradox of Disability: Responses to Jean Vanier and L'Arche Communities from Theology and the Sciences

The Paradox of Disability: Responses to Jean Vanier and L'Arche Communities from Theology and the Sciences

Edited by Hans S. Reinders
Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, July 2010

The village of Trosly-Breuil in northern France is home to the first of well over one hundred L'Arche communities worldwide, where people with and without intellectual disabilities live and work together. In 2007 an impressive assortment of social scientists and theologians gathered there to offer responses to a question posed by L'Arche's visionary founding leader, Jean Vanier: "What have people with disabilities taught me?" Their answers are presented in a diverse collection of essays.

Workshop:

17, 18, and 19 March 2007

La Ferme, Trosley-Breuil, France

Funding Timeline

We are currently accepting Online Funding Inquiries for our Core Funding Areas.

Learn more

Templeton Report

Past Participants

To browse through names of leading thinkers who have participated in previous HAI workshops, click here